Welcome to the  Walla Walla University Department of Mathematics Moodle server. Here you will find resources for all MATH courses offered by the department.

    Available courses

    Designed for students who enter university without having met the mathematics entrance requirements of a one-year course in high school Algebra II. Topics include sets, numbers, exponents, polynomials, factoring rational algebraic expressions, graphs, first and second degree equations, and inequalities. Credit does not apply toward graduation. (Course fees apply.)

    Designed for students in health-related majors, the social sciences, or other fields in which a basic knowledge of statistical methods is required. Topics include sampling, descriptive statistics, simple linear regression, probability, the normal and binomial distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means and proportions, chi-square tests, and simple analysis of variance.  Computer-based lab activities are required.

    Designed for students majoring in scientific or technical fields who need a knowledge of college algebra, or for students preparing to take Calculus I. Topics include integer, rational, real, and complex numbers; solving equations and inequalities; and algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs.

    A continuation of MATH 121.  Topics include trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, matrices, determinants, sequences, mathematical induction, and the binomial theorem.

    A continuation of MATH 131. Topics include integration techniques and applications, multivariable calculus, matrices and eigenvalues, an introduction to differential equations, and a survey of discrete and continuous probability models. Emphasizes those aspects of calculus most relevant to the life sciences, including biology, medicine, and ecology. Designed to meet the general studies requirement for the baccalaureate degree, but will not apply towards a major in mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 181.

    Designed for students majoring in mathematics, engineering, or the physical sciences, or for those seeking a rigorous introduction to the Calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives and applications, and integration up through substitution. Includes formal definitions of the limit, derivative, and Riemann integral as well as proofs of standard theorems, including the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

    A continuation of MATH 181. Topics include indefinite integrals, the calculus of inverse functions, L'Hôpital's rule, techniques and applications of integration, and an introduction to differential equations. Includes formal definitions and proofs of standard theorems.

    A continuation of MATH 281. Topics include sequences, series, tests for convergence, Taylor and Maclaurin series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and vector calculus. Includes formal definitions and proofs of standard theorems.

    A continuation of MATH 282. Topics include differential and integral calculus of multi-variable functions, line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes' theorem. Includes formal definitions and proofs of standard theorems. 

    Designed to introduce students majoring in mathematics, engineering, or the physical sciences to ordinary differential equations as dynamical systems. Topics include linear and non-linear first order equations and systems, higher order linear equations, modeling, standard analytic and qualitative solution methods, equilibria and stability, and phase plane analysis.

    Designed for students majoring in mathematics, engineering, or the physical sciences, or for those seeking a calculus-based survey of probability and statistics. Topics include combinatorics, probability distributions and densities, mathematical expectation, functions of random variables, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and analysis of variance. Includes formal definitions and proofs of standard theorems.

    Designed for mathematics majors who are preparing to take the Senior Mathematics Seminar Sequence. Students will read and discuss a scholarly paper of current interest in the instructor's field of mathematics.

    Designed to give students majoring in mathematics, engineering, or the physical sciences an overview of solution methods for and applications of partial differential equations. Topics include first- and second-order PDEs, boundary-value problems and Fourier series.

    A continuation of MATH 462. Topics include ideals and factor rings, extension fields, and other selected topics such as groups in topology, factorization domains, and Galois theory.

    Continuation of MATH 496. Students will critique the oral reports given in MATH 496, expand on their research if necessary, and prepare a professionally formatted scholarly paper in consultation with their assigned faculty research supervisor.